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Visit ISTI @ IUGG 2019 in Montreal

Visit us at booth #109, IUGG 2019

Montreal Canada  |  8 – 17 July

Meet our team at IUGG in Montreal and learn about the latest offerings.  Paul Friberg & Sid Hellman will be available to answer your questions. Come see the new GEObit GEOtiny digital seismometer (wide-band seismometer and accelerometer all in one convenient package).

Paul Friberg at ISTI’s IUGG booth Exhibitor list
Sid Hellman at ISTI’s IUGG booth The GEOtiny seismometer in action!

ISTI et. al “Radioxenon net count calculations revisited” article

ISTI is pleased to share the “Radioxenon net count calculations revisited” article from the Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, featuring Matthias Auer of ISTI as second author.

Abstract

Since 1998, there have been improvements in the capability to detect atmospheric radioxenon in the International Monitoring System operated by the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. The upgrades have resulted in next-generation versions of the radioxenon systems. This paper explores radioxenon data analysis
improvements beyond the original radioxenon beta–gamma analysis equations that were formulated in 2000 . . . read more here.

ISTI at CTBT SnT Conference June 24 to 28, 2019

ISTI presents, participates and sponsors the 2019 Science And Technology Conference in Vienna Austria this week, June 24 to 28, 2019. ISTI’s Sid Hellman, Matthias Auer, and Josh Stachnik are all at the meeting and looking forward to discussing our work with you. Visit ISTI at Booth #3 in the exhibit space and please come and see our poster on Wednesday T3.5 poster 67 on our Radionuclide work:

STACK DATA PROCESSING PIPELINE, M. Auer, S. Hellman, J. Friese, B. Schrom, T. Bowyer, L. Metz, C. Doll

ISTI @ NY Celebration of Women in Computing, April 12-13, 2019

Sid Hellman of ISTI welcomes attendees to visit him at the 6th ACM-W New York Celebration of Women in Computing, April 12-13, 2019, at the Fort William Henry Hotel and Conference Center in Lake George, NY.

With over 20 years’ experience in scientific software, Sid will be available to share his expertise.

The event program may be found here: http://nycwic.hosting.acm.org/nycwic-2019/program-2019/

Register Now: Earthworm 5-day Course 2019

2019 Earthworm Course in New Paltz, NY, June 3 – 7

This 3 – 7 June, ISTI will host another of our popular Earthworm training courses in New Paltz, New York. This will be our traditional 5-day course. Our full ad may be found here.

We ask that interested students — and any colleagues who wish to join —

please register by 1 March via our contact form.

ISTI CEO and Founder, Paul Friberg teaching EW students. Photographer, ISTI Staff

We’ll cover:

  • Installation
  • Configuration
  • Troubleshooting
  • Archiving and Playback of data
  • Data exchange
  • Visualization tools
  • Overview of various non-Earthworm post-processing options
  • Tuning for Earthquake Location and Magnitudes
  • Programming new modules, learning APIs

In addition, we will provide a tuning session for anyone that wants to bring their network’s Earthworm configuration to the course. We will show you how to playback your data and tune the earthquake location engine.

This course will be useful to anyone setting up, managing, tuning, or developing for an Earthworm system.  See full class details here (inc. location, transportation, etc.).

Again, if you plan to join the Spring ISTI EW 5-day class,

please register by 1 March via our contact form.

Thank you in advance for your confirmation of attendance.

ISTI Poster @ EGU 8 – 13 April

ISTI is pleased to announce that Comparison of Detection and Location Capabilities of Surface Microseismic Monitoring Algorithms, by ISTI authors, will be presented at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly, being held in Vienna, Austria on 8–13 April 2018.

Authors: Ilya Dricker, Paul Friberg, Sidney Hellman

Date: Thu, 12 Apr

Time: 17:30–19:00

Location: Hall X2, X2.382

Abstract

The challenge of the surface microseismic monitoring (MSM) is that small-scale seismic activity which occurs as a result of human activities or industrial processes is often hidden in surface noise on individual seismic records. MSM algorithms must detect and locate signals with average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) significantly less than 1. To improve SNR MSM algorithms compute cost function over a large set of seismic records. Maximum of such function indicates presence, time, and location of the seismic signal. Other algorithms, such as Phase Robust Statistically Optimal and Diagonal Maximum Likelihood Adaptive algorithms offer accuracy improvements of location and detection in presence of correlated industrial noise. In this paper we use synthetic seismograms and seismic observation to compare accuracy of event locations using several algorithms of surface microseismic monitoring.

ISTI’s Rapid Notification Service in Oklahoma helps Operators meet new Oklahoma Hydraulic Fracturing Regulations that Require Seismic Monitoring

On February 27, 2018, the Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) announced new seismic monitoring requirements for minimizing felt induced seismicity from hydraulic fracturing operations in the SCOOP/STACK play. The new requirements state that operators must have access to a seismic monitoring array.  They must take action at magnitue 2.0 (Richter scale) and pause for 6 hours at magnitude 2.5. This is a 0.5 reduction in magnitude levels from previous regulations.

News articles in Oil Price, Reuters, and Bloomberg News and in local Oklahoma media outlets KFOR, Tulsa World, and The Oklahoman are already reporting that operators are taking the new regulations seriously and are installing private networks like those installed and operated by ISTI and it’s partners (HMSC, Inc and GEObit). ISTI can help operators in this region with our real-time monitoring networks for the duration of their completions or for an entire field-wide view using our Rapid Notification Service (RNS) product. ISTI’s Oklahoma and Kansas subscription based RNS provides operators with the information to act before regulators react to any events that may be caused by their completion operations.  An example is a recent 2.1 magnitude earthquake; subscribers were notified within 2 minutes after it occurred (see event map with locating stations below). As a result of the rapid information, nearby operators could modify their well treatment plans for the next stages and attempt to mitigate further larger events.

The cost of being shut-down temporarily for any nuisance earthquakes can be quite high for operators. Rapid information provided by ISTI’s service can allow operators to take action before being required to pause or curtail operations. While the hazard of earthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing is low, there is still the potential for it to trigger larger felt earthquakes as has been observed in Canada. Operators, on the other hand, can mitigate impact to their businesses by taking proper precautions.